We’ve undergone a whole lot of change at TWG in the last few years. We’ve transitioned to new ownership, and we’ve integrated several more plant companies also amidst ownership retirement transitions. All the while, we’ve built and transitioned to entirely new mobile technology systems. These have allowed us to work more efficiently in the field and to maintain an overall higher quality of service that was previously possible, and to do it across a much larger client portfolio. The Associated Press caught wind of everything going on here and came to talk to us about it. The result was this article.

Changes in your business? You should plan, talk to staffers

In this Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019, photo Nick Haschka, owner of The Wright Gardner, center, and Jason Biting, operations associate, load plants onto a delivery truck in South San Francisco, Calif. As Haschka bought four small horticultural businesses over the past two years, he had to help his new employees navigate almost constant change. “They’ve had to get used to a new owner, new management style, and many new processes and tools,” says Haschka. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

NEW YORK (AP) — As Nick Haschka bought four small horticultural businesses over the past two years, he had to help his new employees navigate almost constant change.

“They’ve had to get used to a new owner, new management style, and many new processes and tools,” says Haschka, owner of The Wright Gardner in South San Francisco, California.

Small-business owners who recognize the impact that change can have on employees can limit the fallout by helping staffers with the transition.

Mishandling change — whether it’s a new boss, office or procedures, or a turn in the company’s finances — can prompt staffers to leave or hurt their productivity. Change can also be more than a one-time event. It can be continuous, or, as in the case of Haschka’s business, periodic.

Haschka has taken several steps to help his new employees weather the changes. He’s worked with the previous owners to prepare staffers, many of whom drew some comfort from the fact that their former bosses felt secure about handing their businesses over to Haschka. And he’s sat down and talked to his new team members.

“There’s usually a lot of shock at the beginning when employees find out their owner is leaving and passing the torch to us,” Haschka says. “But we try to make it easy on them by listening and being responsive to their needs.”

He also asks his current employees to help.

“The employees from the previous acquisitions are in a good place to represent and be a sounding board for the new employees — they’ve all been in that place before, and recently,” he says.

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In this Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019, photo Nick Haschka, owner of The Wright Gardner, poses for photos in South San Francisco, Calif. As Haschka bought four small horticultural businesses over the past two years, he had to help his new employees navigate almost constant change. “They’ve had to get used to a new owner, new management style, and many new processes and tools,” says Haschka. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)